AI: Can a machine be held accountable for its actions?

Artificial Intelligence
Can your personal robot hold your place in line, or be compelled to testify against you?

Artificial Intelligence is the buzz. But the emergence of systems capable of independent reasoning and action raises serious questions about just whose interests they are permitted to serve, and what limits our society should place on their creation and use.

Who should be held responsible when a self-driving car kills a pedestrian? Can your personal robot hold your place in line, or be compelled to testify against you? If it turns out to be possible to upload your mind into a machine, is that still you? The answers may surprise you.

Read Artificial Intelligence: What Everyone Needs to Know by Jerry Kaplan for a thoughtful and often surprising survey of the future of AI.

Jerry Kaplan is a serial entrepreneur, AI expert, technical innovator, bestselling author, and futurist, and is best known for his key role in defining the tablet computer industry as founder of GO Corporation in 1987. He is the author of Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence and Startup: A Silicon Valley Adventure. Kaplan holds a BA in History and Philosophy of Science from the University of Chicago (1972), and a PhD in Computer and Information Science (specializing in Artificial Intelligence) from the University of Pennsylvania (1979). He is currently a visiting lecturer at Stanford University, teaching a course entitled “History, Philosophy, Ethics, and Social Impact of Artificial Intelligence” in the Computer Science Department, and is a Fellow at The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics, of the Stanford Law School.