Does Inequality Matter?

Does Inequality Matter
The author claims that undeserved inequalities, wherever and whenever we might find them, are bad in themselves

Does inequality matter? If, as the late Hans Rosling has brilliantly shown, humanity’s lot is steadily improving, why should we care if there’s a small cluster of the grotesquely affluent at the top of the pile?

Shlomi Segall’s Why Inequality Matters addresses this question. Against a rising tide of sufficientarianism and prioritarianism (yes, really — my spell-checker just choked)  Segall argues that the value of equality is not reducible to a concern we might have for the worse off, or to ensuring that individuals do not fall into poverty and destitution; instead he claims that undeserved inequalities, wherever and whenever we might find them, are bad in themselves.